Upcoming Webinars

Please note: the webinars listed on this page are hosted by other organizations, so any questions regarding the webinars should be sent to the relevant organization, and not PICNet. Webber Teleclasses are listed on a different page.

Feb 26 – June 19

Knowledge Translation and Implementation Science (six-part webinar series)

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Host: CPSI
Dates: See below
Register at http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/events/ktis-webcast-series-2018/pages/default.aspx

Topic: Knowledge Translation and Implementation Science are interested in the scientific study of implementation determinants, processes and outcomes to inform guidance and tools that can be used to implement evidence-based practices, including patient safety initiatives. Registration is open now for the first two webinars in the series.

Webinar Series

Webinar 1: Introduction to Knowledge Translation and Implementation Science
February 26th, 2018
Webinar 2: Knowledge creation & synthesis
March 28th, 2018
Webinar 3: Who needs to do what, differently, to promote implementation?
April 4th, 2018
Webinar 4: Identifying barriers and enablers, and determinants, in theory
May 2nd, 2018
Webinar 5: Identifying barriers and enablers, and determinants, in practice
May 30th, 2018
Webinar 6: Selecting strategies and techniques best suited to address barriers measurement and evaluation
June 19, 2018

Who should register for these webinars: Participants may include the public, providers and leaders who are new to knowledge translation and implementation science and are interested in considering how they might leverage such approaches when planning and evaluation the implementation of patient safety initiatives.

Feb 27

Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network (SPSN) first estimates of mid-season influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) for the 2017/18 season

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Host: BCCDC Grand Rounds
Date and time:
Tuesday Feb 27, 12-1 pm   
Location
: Lane Level Lecture Hall
Webinar link: click here 
Please note:  you will need MS Silverlight to view this webinar.  According to PHSA Mediasite, Google Chrome no longer supports the Microsoft Silverlight player that is required for these live webcasts. If you have a PC, then Internet Explorer should work. If you are using a Mac, we recommend using Firefox.

Presenter: Dr. Danuta Skowronski

Topic: The 2017/18 influenza season has been characterized by co-circulation of A (H3N2) and B (Yamagata) viruses, the latter unusual so early in the season. Low vaccine effectiveness (VE) was anticipated following interim report from Australia indicating VE of just 10% using the same vaccine components during its 2017 A(H3N2) epidemic. Dr. Skowronski will present interim 2017/18 VE estimates from participating provinces of the Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network (SPSN), alongside genetic characterization of contributing viruses.

Presenter Bio: Dr. Danuta Skowronski is Epidemiology Lead responsible for surveillance, rapid response research and program/policy recommendations for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC). She has ~145 scientific publications, primarily related to influenza, and has participated in numerous provincial, national and international expert advisory committees and guidelines.

About the Grand Rounds: BCCDC Public Health Grand Rounds is a self-approved group learning activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Offsite participants (MDs only) can earn MoC credits by notifying Cletus.DSouza@bccdc.ca  about their attendance providing their name, title, institution, email address and phone.

On behalf of the Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network:

Key Findings:

  • The 2017/18 influenza season in Canada has been characterized by an equal mix of influenza A (49%) and influenza B (51%) viruses, the latter being unusual so early in the season.
  • VE against A(H3N2) was low at around 10-20% overall; confidence intervals around these estimates included zero, meaning we cannot rule out the possibility of no vaccine protection against A(H3N2) this season.
  • Similarly low VE of 10% was found in working-age adults who comprise the majority of SPSN patients contributing to VE analysis.
  • This estimate for A(H3N2) is similar to findings reported by Australia during their recent 2017 season (10%) but is about half that reported in interim and end-of-season analyses for the prior 2016/17 season by Canada, the United States and Europe (~30-40%).
  • The same A(H3N2) vaccine component was used for the 2016/17 northern, 2017 southern and 2017/18 northern hemisphere vaccines.
  • Our estimate is also lower than expected generally for A(H3N2) vaccines (~30%).
  • A(H3N2) viruses collected through the SPSN were sequenced to assess the relative mix of circulating virus strains contribution to VE estimates.
  • About 90% of SPSN sequences for the 2017/18 season belonged to a virus strain named clade 3C.2a subgroup 3 by org.
  • This profile for the current 2017/18 season is similar to other surveillance observations in Canada (such as through the National Microbiology Laboratory), but is different from the prior 2016/17 northern and 2017 southern hemisphere seasons when a more diverse mix of influenza strains was seen.
  • Higher VE was observed for influenza B at around 50% overall and 40% in working-age adults.
  • The influenza B component included in this season’s trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) was mismatched to the majority of circulating influenza B viruses, suggesting cross-protection.

Public health implications:

  • Influenza viruses continue to circulate at high levels in many places across Canada, including the A(H3N2) subtype that tends to have a greater disease burden and is associated with more severe outcomes (e.g. hospitalization) in elderly adults.
  • While the influenza epidemic is ongoing, 2017/18 mid-season VE findings of low VE for A(H3N2) reinforce the recommendation for early use of adjunct protective measures (e.g. early antiviral treatment) to minimise the associated disease burden in high-risk individuals.
  • See AMMI guidelines published earlier this season with contribution from SPSN investigators.
  • Given the low VE for the 2017/18 season, in particular for the A(H3N2) component, even people who got this year’s influenza vaccine (“flu shot”) may still be at risk for infection.
  • Mid-season VE estimates integrated with ongoing monitoring of influenza strain circulation will be used to inform strain selection for the upcoming 2018/19 northern hemisphere vaccine when the World Health Organization meets later in February 2018.
March 20

BCCDC Grand Rounds: Transition from Prescription to Injection Drug Use: Learnings from the BC Hepatitis Testing Cohort

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Host: BCCDC Grand Rounds
Date and time:
Tuesday March 20th 2018, 12:00PM to 1:00PM   
Location
: Lane Level Lecture Hall
Webinar link: click here 
Please note:  you will need MS Silverlight to view this webinar.  According to PHSA Mediasite, Google Chrome no longer supports the Microsoft Silverlight player that is required for these live webcasts. If you have a PC, then Internet Explorer should work. If you are using a Mac, we recommend using Firefox.

Presenter: Dr. Roy Purssell

Topic: An epidemic of opioid overdose deaths is occurring.  As people who inject drugs have the highest risk of overdose death, it is essential to understand why people are initiating IDU. Data suggests that many patients who use intravenous drugs transitioned to this practice from prescription opioid use but there is limited knowledge about the frequency of transition from prescription opioid use to IDU and the factors driving this transition. This study evaluates the risk of IDU and the factors influencing this risk in a population cohort of 1.4 million, the BC Hepatitis Testing Cohort (BC-HTC). The hazard ratios were determined using time dependent covariates and time dependent coefficients using the Cox proportional-hazards regression models. Chronic opioid use was defined as prescription opioid use with any episode of medication use lasting longer than 90 days.

Presenter Bio: Dr. Roy Purssell is the Medical Lead of the BC Drug and Poison Information Centre, BC Centre for Disease Control. He is also a Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of British Columbia and an emergency physician at Vancouver General Hospital. He is certified in the subspecialty of Medical Toxicology by the American Board of Emergency Medicine and he is a Fellow of the American College of Medical Toxicology.

About the Grand Rounds: BCCDC Public Health Grand Rounds is a self-approved group learning activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.  Offsite participants (MDs only) can earn MoC credits by notifying Cletus.DSouza@bccdc.ca  about their attendance providing their name, title, institution, email address and phone.

For those attending in person, please bring your own cup and enjoy a coffee or tea on us!

Recently Archived Webinars

BCCDC Grand Rounds: Canadian National Vaccine Safety (CANVAS) Network: Active Safety Surveillance for Influenza Vaccines, 2017-18

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Host: BCCDC Grand Rounds
Date and time:
February 6
Location
: Lane Level Lecture Hall
Webinar link: click here

Presenter: Dr. Julie Bettinger

Summary of the talk: The Canadian National Vaccine Safety (CANVAS) network, a sentinel network, was established in 2009 and now provides annual influenza vaccine safety information from >35,000 adults and children across Canada. The primary objective is to estimate the frequency of adverse events of sufficient severity to cause medical consultation or prevent daily activities in children and adults vaccinated against influenza and to determine whether event rates in vaccinees are higher than event rates in unvaccinated controls. Safety data from this season’s influenza vaccines will be discussed.

Bio: Dr. Bettinger is an Associate Professor at the Vaccine Evaluation Center in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia and a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Scholar. She is an infectious disease epidemiologist whose research interests include vaccine safety and vaccine preventable diseases, as well as attitudes and beliefs around immunization uptake and use. She is the epidemiologist for the Canadian Immunization Monitoring Program, Active (IMPACT), an active surveillance network for vaccine preventable diseases and vaccine adverse events in 12 tertiary care pediatric hospitals across Canada and the lead investigator for CIRN’s Canadian National Vaccine Safety (CANVAS) network, which monitors the safety of influenza vaccines each year.

BCCDC Grand Rounds: Salmonella Enteritidis: Can Whole Genome Sequencing Tackle This Elusive Enteric Pathogen?

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Host: BCCDC Grand Rounds
Date and time:
  January 30, 12-1pm 
Webinar link: click here.

Presenters: Drs. Linda Hoang and Natalie Prystajecky

Summary of the talk: Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) continues to be one of the most prevalent bacterial enteric pathogens in BC (MT: consider adding a comment that it has been causing an outbreak in BC since 2008). Laboratory-based surveillance using typing tools such as Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Phage Typing (PT) have not provided sufficient discriminatory power to identify clusters for public health follow up. Since May 2017, whole genome sequencing (WGS) methods are routinely used for laboratory-based surveillance of human Salmonella in BC and Canada. In addition to highlighting the utility of WGS methods for enteric outbreak investigations, we will present preliminary SE One Health perspective, integrating clinical, animal and food data to show the relationship between SE strains found in human, animal and food and improving our understanding of the sources of human illness.

Bios:

Dr. Linda Hoang is a Medical Microbiologist based at the BC Centre for Disease Control as the Program Head for Bacteriology & Mycology laboratory since 2006. Her clinical and academic interests include healthcare-acquired infections and antibiotic resistant organisms, agents of bioterrorism and containment level-3 pathogens, and enteric bacterial pathogens related outbreaks in BC.

Dr. Natalie Prystajecky is the Program Head for Environmental Microbiology at the BCCDC Public Health Laboratory and Clinical Assistant Professor at UBC. Her work at the BCCDC PHL is at the intersect of environmental exposures (food and water) and clinical outcomes, and using emerging technologies to improve surveillance and outbreak investigations. Her research interests are broad, ranging from water metagenomics, to targeted resequencing of wetland sediments for avian influenza to whole genome sequencing of Salmonella.

About the Grand Rounds: BCCDC Public Health Grand Rounds is a self-approved group learning activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.  Offsite participants (MDs only) can earn MoC credits by notifying Cletus.DSouza@bccdc.ca  about their attendance providing their name, title, institution, email address and phone. 

BCCDC Grand Rounds: Solutions to the Problem of Infections Caused by Multi-Drug (MDR) Resistant Infections

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Host: BCCDC Grand Rounds
Date:
 January 23  
Webinar link: click here 
Please note:  you will need MS Silverlight to view this webinar.  According to PHSA Mediasite, Google Chrome no longer supports the Microsoft Silverlight player that is required for these live webcasts. If you have a PC, then Internet Explorer should work. If you are using a Mac, we recommend using Firefox.

Presenter: Dr. George Zhanel

Summary of the talk: Dr. Zhanel will talk about: infection control, antibiotic stewardship, new and investigational, bacteriotherapy and the SAVE vaccine study. Objectives for this talk include:
1. review the key pathogens of interest causing antimicrobial resistant infections
2. discuss the role of infection control and antimicrobial stewardship in controlling resistant infections
3. review new/investigational antibiotics
4. Discuss the roe of vaccination to lower resistance infections.

Bio: Dr. Zhanel received his Ph.D. in the Department of Medical Microbiology/Infectious Diseases at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba and a Doctor of Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Minnesota. He is presently Professor in the Department of Medical Microbiology/Infectious Diseases, College of Medicine; Course Leader, Infectious Diseases Teaching, College of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Coordinator of Antibiotic Resistance in the Departments of Medicine and Clinical Microbiology, Health Sciences Centre; and Research Director of the Canadian Antimicrobial Resistance Alliance (CARA). Dr Zhanel is the founding and Chief Editor of the Canadian Antimicrobial Resistance Alliance (CARA) website (www.can-r.ca). As research director of the Canadian Antimicrobial Resistance Alliance, Dr. Zhanel’s research interests include understanding the prevalence, epidemiology and spread of antimicrobial resistant infections, describing the clinical relevance of resistant infections, identifying and developing rapid diagnostic methods to rapidly diagnose infections, investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of resistance, assessing activity of investigational antimicrobials as well as discovering novel antimicrobials (holder of several patents). Dr. Zhanel has been involved in treatment guideline development for a variety of infectious diseases and is also interested in antimicrobial usage/resistance in humans, animals and food and the impact of antimicrobial exposure on human and animal microbiomes. 

Reducing infection rates through optimal healthcare design: How you can change your environment to positively impact patient safety outcomes

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Host: CPSI
Date:  January 23 
Read more and view the archive here 

Presenters: Tracey Herlihey PhD, Chantal Trudel MSc, and Janet Brintnell

Webinar summary: Think Human factors doesn’t have an impact on clinical outcomes like infection rates? Guess again! According to the World Health Organization (2017), infections acquired in healthcare settings represent the most frequent adverse event occurring in the delivery of healthcare and no institution or country has solved the problem yet. Furthermore, with growing concerns for antibiotic resistance, effective strategies to support infection prevention and control (IPAC) are in desperate need.

This webinar presents two case studies where human factors/ergonomics research and interventions focused on improving our understanding of design’s influence on infection transmission and design considerations to support IPAC. These case studies will help organizations see the benefits of applying a human factors approach in designing optimal environments to reduce the spread of infection.

Vector-borne and Zoonotic Diseases in BC: Using Cases to Understand Diagnostic and Public Health Challenges

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Host: BCCDC Grand Rounds
Date and time:
January 9, 12-1pm
Webinar link: click here

Presenter: Dr. Muhammad Morshed

Bio: Dr. Muhammad Morshed is a Clinical Microbiologist and Program Head of Zoonotic Diseases and Emerging Pathogens Section as well as Parasitology Section of BC Centre for Disease Control’s Public Health Laboratory. He is also a Clinical Professor in the Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, at University of British Columbia. His laboratory is responsible for specialized serology testing, molecular testing and microbial fingerprinting, program evaluation on various vector-borne, zoonotic diseases and emerging pathogens. His research interest primarily focused on syphilis and Lyme disease.

Influenza, 2017-18: Issues and Implications

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Host: BCCDC Grand Rounds
Date and time:
Dec 5th 2017, 12:00- 1:00PM   
Presenter: Dr. Danuta Skowronski
Webinar link: click here 

Topic: Amid much speculation, join us to hear this influenza expert provide a candid analysis of issues and implications for the upcoming influenza season.

Presenter Bio: Dr. Danuta Skowronski is Epidemiology Lead responsible for surveillance, rapid response research and program/policy recommendations for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC). She has ~145 scientific publications, primarily related to influenza, and has participated in numerous provincial, national and international expert advisory committees and guidelines.

 

BCCDC Grand Rounds Archives

Did you miss a Grand Round that you’d like to have seen? Most of them are archived on the PHSA Mediasite.

BC Patient Safety and Quality Council (BCPSQC) Webinars

There are many archived webinars on the BCPSQC website.

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