Dr. Elizabeth Bryce

Regional Medical Director, Infection Control/Medical Microbiology, Vancouver Coastal Health;
Co-Medical Lead, PICNet

We should never forget that we live in a microbial world – it’s all about maintaining a healthy relationship between ourselves and microbes.

What is your education and work background?
Bachelor of Science (Hons); MD, FRCPC Internal Medicine, FRCPC Medical Microbiology.

What got you interested in infection control?
It evolved naturally through my interest in Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology.

What does your current job involve?
The duties of a medical microbiologist for a large regional laboratory as well as medical oversight for the infection prevention and control program at VCH.

What do you like best about your job?
I like the fact that there is often no one correct answer, that you have to be a critical thinker and pragmatic and that you have the ability to interact with workers across the spectrum of healthcare.

Why is your job important?
It impacts directly on patient outcomes, and the quality of their healthcare experience.

What message would you like to share with staff?
We should never forget that we live in a microbial world – it’s all about maintaining ahealthy relationship between ourselves and microbes.

Tell us about your hobbies!
I love to hike and garden. My entire yard (back and front) is nothing but plants.

BackToPage BackToTop24

Dr. Linda Hoang

Medical Microbiologist, Program Head, Public Health Advanced Bacteriology/ Mycology Lab, BCCDC Public Health Laboratory;
Co-Medical Lead, PICNet

 

Dr. Linda Hoang received her Master’s and Medical Degrees from UBC and is FRCP(C) qualified in Medical Microbiology (UBC). She also obtained a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the London School of Hygiene and Epidemiology, UK.

Dr. Hoang has been formally based at the BC Centre for Disease Control as the Program Head for Bacteriology & Mycology laboratory since 2006, but has been involved in BCCDC-led projects in Vietnam and BC starting in 1998. She enjoys teaching and is the BCCDC site-supervisor for the UBC Medical Microbiology Residency Training Program.

Her clinical and academic interests include agents of bioterrorism and containment level-3 pathogens, healthcare-acquired infections and antibiotic resistant organisms, Cryptococcus gattii, and enteric bacterial pathogens related outbreaks in BC.

BackToPage BackToTop24

Tara Donovan, MSc

Network Director

Tara Donovan     

Tara comes to PICNet from Fraser Health, where she has been working since 2010 as the regional IPC Epidemiologist, and more recently as the Managing Consultant for IPC. She has gained strong leadership and management experience in her time at Fraser, and also as Director of Standards and Guidelines on the Board of IPAC Canada. Tara is certified in Infection Control and holds a Master’s of Science in Community Health and Epidemiology. Her strong skillsets in both surveillance and leadership will be very valuable assets she brings into her new role with PICNet.

BackToPage BackToTop24

Dr. Guanghong Han

Surveillance Epidemiologist

Guanghong Many infections are preventable – and everyone can contribute.

What is your education and work background?
My undergraduate was in preventive medicine, then I obtained my master’s degree in epidemiology and biostatistics, and doctoral degree in epidemiology. I also completed the Canadian Field Epidemiology Program as a field epidemiologist.

What got you interested in infection control?
After working in public health surveillance and research for many years, I found that I liked the new opportunities and challenges in the field of infection prevention and control.

What does your current job involve?
Monitoring healthcare-associated infections and intervention activities in healthcare facilities, and reporting back to healthcare providers, administrators, and the public.

What do you like best about your job?
It feels great to work with people who care about vulnerable patients, and who all do a good job.

Why is your job important?
Surveillance helps people understand the importance of infection control, and also helps them make sound decisions. It provides transparency and accountability on patient safety and quality care.

What message would you like to share with staff?
Many infections are preventable; and everyone can contribute.

Tell us about your hobbies!
Jogging and travel.

BackToPage BackToTop24

Joanne Archer, RN, BTech, MA, CIC

Education and Practice Coordinator

Infection prevention and control principles and practices should be woven into every element of health care

What is your education and work background?
I completed my RN at Douglas College, BTech in Specialty Nursing (Emergency) at BCIT and Masters in Disability Management at UNBC. I began working as a nurse in 1977, and have worked in several different facilities in BC and Alberta, from small community to large tertiary facilities. The majority of my time at the point of care was spent in ICU or Emergency. I was among the first group of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners in the new program in Victoria, in 1996. Other positions included Chief Nurse at 2015 Canada Winter Games, and Coordinator of Injury Prevention Programs for youth and teens and School Nurse at Brentwood College. I have taken breaks from nursing and worked as a Travel Agent and a Computer Data Technician for the Federal Department of Fisheries (research data).

What got you interested in infection control?
While coordinating a teen injury prevention program that was based out of a large hospital, I became involved with the management of these students during a Norovirus outbreak.

What does your current job involve?
Many things: critical appraisal of research; writing evidence-based guidelines and discussion/advice papers; collaborating with various experts to develop protocols for new patient therapies that have significant infection control elements; providing support and advice, as requested, by Infection Control Services and professionals and the Ministry of Health; collaborating with groups across BC and the rest of Canada to work toward improving infection prevention and control knowledge and practices; developing education opportunities and learning modules for health care providers; planning an annual conference for the education of those involved in Infection Prevention and Control.

What do you like best about your job?
The opportunity to work at more of a systems level to improve the safe care of our beloved patients and the safety of my colleagues at the point of care, and the opportunity to meet and collaborate with many people involved in the preventing and controlling infections and various experts in BC and across Canada.

Why is your job important?
Infection prevention and control principles and practices should be woven into every element of health care, like a tapestry. Historically there has not been a coordinated, unified approach in BC or Canada.

What message would you like to share with staff?
Infection prevention and control practices are as fundamental as breathing. Know what they are and weave them into your care so that they become as rooted into the way you provide care as breathing is for your body.

Tell us about your hobbies!
I love to travel, dance, figure skate, track and field, hike. My big adventure this summer was canoeing the Bowren Lakes chain (106 km, 10 lakes, 6 portages). I was a recipient of the ARNBC Award of Excellence in Education award, 2016.

BackToPage BackToTop24

 

Romi Ranasinghe

Surveillance Systems Coordinator

After watching the movie Contagion, I knew that I wanted to chase infectious monkeys, leap out of helicopters, and use epidemiology to save the day.

What is your education and work background?
I have a Master of Public Health degree from UBC, and had some background in TB research and influenza surveillance, prior to joining PICNet.

What got you interested in infection control?
I watched the movie Contagion, and knew right away that I wanted to one day chase infectious monkeys, leap out of helicopters, and use epidemiology to save the day.

What does your current job involve?
Mostly working with data provided to PICNet by the health authorities. We look at rates and general trends of MRSA, C. difficile infection, CPO, and hand cleaning compliance in hospitals, from a provincial perspective, and compile quarterly and annual reports.

What do you like best about your job?
How collaborative it is: it involves working with so many different players in different roles and levels throughout the province.

Why is your job important?
Antibiotic resistance is a huge worldwide issue. Surveillance and monitoring is just one of the many ways to address this new issue.

What message would you like to share with staff?
Go watch the movie Contagion. :)

Tell us about your hobbies!
I love water: being in it, on it, near it. I even really like it when it falls from the sky (rain), which is a plus when living in Vancouver!

BackToPage BackToTop24

Return to Management Office page